Vineyards

Vineyards and farming practices

The estate's 50 hectares of vineyards are exclusively dedicated to three varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and a unique and precious clone: Sangiovese Grosso BBS11.
Vineyards

Vineyards and farming practices

The estate’s 50 hectares of vineyards are exclusively dedicated to three varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and a unique and precious clone: Sangiovese Grosso BBS11.

T

he vineyards of Castello di Montepò occupy 50 of total 600 hectares that form the estate. 70% of the vineyard is dedicated to Sangiovese Grosso BBS11, the exclusive property of the Biondi Santi family, while the remaining 30% is occupied by two other red-skinned international varieties, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The training system adopted for each 20-year old plant is mainly the spurred cordon. The company’s staff, thanks to a monitoring system that makes use of a network of control units located all across the vineyard, is constantly up to date on all aspects of the plant’s vegetative development.

H

aving cross-referenced alntions, when necessary, begin in the first ten days of January with the winter pruning, needed to establish the number of fruit-bearing buds for each plant and the subsequent yield. Once this operation is completed, the new trunks are secured and, if necessary, the stakes supporting each vine are replaced. Then comes inter-row management, the unearthing of the vine stems which removes weeds by working the rows alternately; however, one row is left standing in grass to facilitate later operations and maintain soil quality.

T

he vineyards of Castello di Montepò occupy 50 of total 600 hectares that form the estate. 70% of the vineyard is dedicated to Sangiovese Grosso BBS11, the exclusive property of the Biondi Santi family, while the remaining 30% is occupied by two other red-skinned international varieties, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The training system adopted for each 20-year old plant is mainly the spurred cordon. The company’s staff, thanks to a monitoring system that makes use of a network of control units located all across the vineyard, is constantly up to date on all aspects of the plant’s vegetative development.

H

aving cross-referenced alntions, when necessary, begin in the first ten days of January with the winter pruning, needed to establish the number of fruit-bearing buds for each plant and the subsequent yield. Once this operation is completed, the new trunks are secured and, if necessary, the stakes supporting each vine are replaced. Then comes inter-row management, the unearthing of the vine stems which removes weeds by working the rows alternately; however, one row is left standing in grass to facilitate later operations and maintain soil quality.

M

ay is the month of shoot thinning, to optimise the vine’s foliage, while July is the time to begin thinning the clusters, the last important operation before harvest time, which begins in the second half of September and lasts on average two weeks. Furthermore, work in Castello di Montepò is underway to increase the portion of ​​the estate planted to vine. This is long and exacting work especially in its initial stages, because for it to receive new vine stock the soil must be prepared two years in advance, starting from the opening-up and the ploughing operations performed by means of an harrow, an agricultural machine that breaks up and levels the soil. Subsequently, it’s time for tillage, a process that consists in breaking up the soil to ensure its in-depth oxygenation and the removal of waste-rock. Once these processes are completed, the water drainage system is created and the new planting pattern is laid out, according to sun and wind exposure and the incline of the terrain. Then, rooted cuttings are planted, and, subsequently, poles, wires and anchors are put in alongside all the containment vegetation such as broad beans, legumes and rapeseed, in order to nourish the soil and protect it from surface runoff.

M

ay is the month of shoot thinning, to optimise the vine’s foliage, while July is the time to begin thinning the clusters, the last important operation before harvest time, which begins in the second half of September and lasts on average two weeks. Furthermore, work in Castello di Montepò is underway to increase the portion of ​​the estate planted to vine. This is long and exacting work especially in its initial stages, because for it to receive new vine stock the soil must be prepared two years in advance, starting from the opening-up and the ploughing operations performed by means of an harrow, an agricultural machine that breaks up and levels the soil. Subsequently, it’s time for tillage, a process that consists in breaking up the soil to ensure its in-depth oxygenation and the removal of waste-rock. Once these processes are completed, the water drainage system is created and the new planting pattern is laid out, according to sun and wind exposure and the incline of the terrain. Then, rooted cuttings are planted, and, subsequently, poles, wires and anchors are put in alongside all the containment vegetation such as broad beans, legumes and rapeseed, in order to nourish the soil and protect it from surface runoff.


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The Soil

The terrain surrounding Castello di Montepò, thanks to its particular geology, is naturally suited to the cultivation of vines and tree crops.

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Dry-land Farming

Using only the water resources provided by nature, Castello di Montepò brings the quality of its wines to a higher level, producing small batches of grapes of outstanding value.

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The hills of the Castello di Montepò estate are known for their viticultural vocation. The company’s vineyards grow on deposits of Flysch, sedimentary rock layers dating back to the Eocene era, consisting of alternate strata of sandstone, clay and marlstone. These elements combine to make the soil lean and rich in gravel, with intrusions of compact calcareous sandstone. A unique mineral and physical profile which makes Castello di Montepò a unique terroir, exerting a great influence on the physiology of the vine and its adaptation to practices such as dry-land farming.

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To produce wines of the finest quality, every element between land and sky contributing to the vegetative-productive development of the plants must undergo the least possible number of interventions. An oenological goal that Jacopo Biondi Santi has pursued by perfecting a regime that seeks balance and sustainability in the vineyards of the Castello di Montepò estate, centred on the principles of dry farming. By rationalizing and optimizing all available natural water resources, the varietal integrity of the plants is preserved, thus favouring a quantitatively limited but high quality production thanks to the greater concentration of sugars and aromatic compounds within the grapes’ skins. It is the size of the grape and the skin / pulp ratio that, in red varieties especially, determines the most important result, a necessary premise to achievement of the productive standards that have made the name of Castello di Montepò and the Biondi Santi family worldwide. Perfectly balanced plants, integrated with their natural habitat and the physical/mineral composition of the soil, these are all decisive factors in defining the oenological profile of Jacopo Biondi Santi’s fine wines.

CASTELLO DI MONTEPÒ

A wine story

In the heart of Maremma, Jacopo Biondi Santi and his children are writing a new chapter in their family’s history of winemaking excellence.

CASTELLO DI MONTEPÒ

A wine story

In the heart of Maremma, Jacopo Biondi Santi and his children are writing a new chapter in their family’s history of winemaking excellence.

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Castello di Montepò – Jacopo Biondi Santi